Anti-war Russian journalist fined under ‘gay propaganda’ law


Lefortovo district court said the 35-year-old was fined for disseminating “propaganda for non-traditional sexual relationships among minors”.

Russian journalist Yury Dud was fined 120,000 roubles ($2,024) by a Moscow court on Tuesday under a law that bans “propaganda” in support of gay relationships.

Lefortovo district court said the 35-year-old was fined for disseminating “propaganda for non-traditional sexual relationships among minors”.

Former sports reporter Dud, 35, is one of Russia’s top media stars, having risen to prominence via acerbic, politically tinged interviews and documentaries uploaded to YouTube, where he has over 10 million subscribers.

In October last year, Dud was fined 100,000 roubles ($1689) on charges of “drugs propaganda”, after a pro-Kremlin lobby group asked Russia’s internal affairs ministry to investigate him.

On April 15, Dud was designated a foreign agent by Russia’s justice ministry after publicly opposing Russia’s war in Ukraine, which he dubbed an “imperial frenzy”.

Human rights lawyer Pavel Chikov said the case against Dud was based on a 2021 YouTube interview he conducted with a gay performance artist, although Chikov said the interview was not about homosexuality.

Russia has since 2013 criminalised “propagandising” non-traditional sexual orientations to children, as part of the Kremlin’s wider conservative agenda. Last week, parliamentary speaker Vyacheslav Volodin called for a complete ban on promoting “non-traditional values” in Russia.


Close Story

Anti-war Russian journalist fined under ‘gay propaganda' law

Less time to read?

Try Quickreads

Anti-war Russian journalist fined under ‘gay propaganda' law

  • Pope Francis waves as he leads the Angelus prayer from his window, at the Vatican.

    Argentina, the Vatican or? Pope Francis reveals retirement plans

    Pope Francis said he would not live in the Vatican or return to his native Argentina if and when he ever retires, but would instead like to find a church in Rome where he could continue hearing confessions. Francis, 85, denied he was planning to retire any time soon but repeated that “the door is open” after Pope Benedict XVI in 2013 became the first pope in 600 years to step down.

  • Sri Lankan President Gotabaya Rajapaksa. (Photo by Ishara S KODIKARA/AFP) (File photo)

  • Ukrainian officials said their forces had destroyed an ammunition depot in Nova Kakhovka.

    At least seven killed by Ukrainian strike on Russian-held town: Report

    At least seven people were killed and 70 wounded in an overnight missile attack by Ukrainian forces on the Russian-held town of Nova Kakhovka in Ukraine’s southern Kherson region, the Russian-installed administration there said on Tuesday. Ukrainian officials said their forces had destroyed an ammunition depot in Nova Kakhovka. Odesa administration spokesperson, Serhiy Bratchuk, wrote on his Telegram channel that Nova Kakhovka was now “minus” its ammunition warehouse. Reuters could not immediately verify battlefield reports.

  • Monkeypox, a rare viral disease, occurs primarily in tropical rainforest areas of Central and West Africa, though it is occasionally exported to other regions.

    Russia registers first case of monkeypox

    Russia has confirmed the first case of monkeypox in a young man who recently returned from Europe, the country’s consumer rights watchdog told reporters on Tuesday. Rospotrebnadzor clarified that the patient has mild symptoms and is isolated. In the last week of June, the World Health Organization said the monkeypox outbreak does not currently constitute a global public health concern but added that “intense response efforts” are needed to control further spread.

  • Tetsuya Yamagami - suspected of killing former Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, is escorted by a police officer. (Credit: Kyodo via REUTERS)

    Japan church blamed by Shinzo Abe’s killer confirms mother is member: Report

    Japan’s Unification Church has denied any link to Tetsuya Yamagami – who assassinated ex-prime minister Shinzo Abe last week believinYamagamihe promoted the group that defrauded his mother – but admitted Yamagami’s mother is a member. Neither Tetsuya nor Abe are members, Tomihiro Tanaka, the president of the Japanese branch of the Family Federation for World Peace and Unification, known as the Unification Church, told reporters in Tokyo.